HD OPERA

January 28, 1930
 

LA BOHEME • MET Opera On The Big Screen Mar 7 • SPECIAL TIME 7PM

LA BOHEME
MET Opera On The Big Screen
Tickets: $27.12

ON SALE JULY 28


The Capitol is a proud presenter of MET Opera in HD via Cineplex.
• 6pm Refreshments
 with Guest Speaker in the Sculthorpe Theatre
• SPECHIAL TIME:   7pm Opera coverage begins
Call for Opera packages: 5 Operas: $26 each, 8 Operas: $24.86 each

OVERVIEW

The world’s most popular opera returns in Franco Zeffirelli’s classic production, with a series of exciting casts. Angel Blue, Anita Hartig, and Sonya Yoncheva (left) share the role of the fragile Mimì, with Dmytro Popov, Russell Thomas, and Michael Fabiano alternating as the poet Rodolfo. Alexander Soddy and Marco Armiliato share conducting duties.

Production a gift of Mrs. Donald D. Harrington

 

CREATORS

Giacomo Puccini (1858–1924) was immensely popular in his own lifetime, and his mature works remain staples in the repertory of most of the world’s opera companies. His librettists for La Bohème, Giuseppe Giacosa (1847–1906) and Luigi Illica (1857–1919), also collaborated with him on his next two operas, Tosca and Madama Butterfly. Giacosa, a dramatist, was responsible for the stories and Illica, a poet, worked primarily on the words themselves.

PRODUCTION: Franco Zeffirelli
SET DESIGNER: Franco Zeffirelli
COSTUME DESIGNER: Peter J. Hall
LIGHTING DESIGNER: Gil Wechsler

SETTING

The libretto sets the action in Paris, circa 1830. This is not a random setting, but rather reflects the issues and concerns of a particular time when, following the upheavals of revolution and war, French artists had lost their traditional support base of aristocracy and church. The story centers on self-conscious youth at odds with mainstream society—a Bohemian ambience that is clearly recognizable in any modern urban center. La Bohème captures this ethos in its earliest days.

MUSIC

Lyrical and touchingly beautiful, the score of La Bohème exerts an immediate emotional pull. Many of its most memorable melodies are built incrementally, with small intervals between the notes that carry the listener with them on their lyrical path. This is a distinct contrast to the grand leaps and dives that earlier operas often depended on for emotional effect. La Bohème’s melodic structure perfectly captures the “small people” (as Puccini called them) of the drama and the details of everyday life.

 

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