HD OPERA

January 30, 1930
 

TOSCA • MET Opera Live On The Big Screen Jan 27

TOSCA
MET Opera Live On The Big Screen
Tickets: $27.12

ON SALE JULY 28


The Capitol is a proud presenter of MET Opera in HD via Cineplex.
• 12pm 
Brown Bag Lunch with Guest Speaker in the Sculthorpe Theatre
• 12:55pm Opera coverage begins
Call for Opera packages: 5 Operas: $26 each, 8 Operas: $24.86 each

OVERVIEW

Premiere: Teatro Costanzi, Rome, 1900. Puccini’s melodrama about a volatile diva, a sadistic police chief, and an idealistic artist has offended and thrilled audiences for more than a century. Critics, for their part, have often had problems with Tosca’s rather grungy subject matter, the directness and intensity of its score, and the crowd-pleasing dramatic opportunities it provides for its lead roles. But these same aspects have made Tosca one of a handful of iconic works that seem to represent opera in the public imagination. Tosca’s popularity is further secured by a superb and exhilarating dramatic sweep, a driving score of abundant melody and theatrical shrewdness, and a career-defining title role.

Production a gift of Jaqueline Desmarais, in memory of Paul G. Desmarais Sr; The Paiko Foundation; and Elena Prokupets with major funding from Rolex

 

CREATORS

Giacomo Puccini (1858–1924) was immensely popular in his own lifetime, and his mature works remain staples in the repertory of most of the world’s opera companies. His operas are celebrated for their mastery of detail, sensitivity to everyday subjects, copious melody, and economy of expression. Puccini’s librettists for Tosca, Giuseppe Giacosa (1847–1906) and Luigi Illica (1857–1919), also collaborated with him on his two other most enduringly successful operas, La Bohème and Madama Butterfly. Giacosa, a dramatist, was responsible for the stories, and Illica, a poet, worked primarily on the words themselves.

PRODUCTION: Sir David McVicar
SET DESIGNER: John Macfarlane
COSTUME DESIGNER: John Macfarlane
LIGHTING DESIGNER: David Finn

SETTING

No opera is more tied to its setting than Tosca, which takes place in Rome on the morning of June 17, 1800, through dawn the following day. The specified settings for each of the three acts—the Church of Sant’Andrea della Valle, Palazzo Farnese, and Castel Sant’Angelo—are familiar monuments in the city and can still be visited today. While the libretto takes some liberties with the facts, historical issues form a basis for the opera: the people of Rome are awaiting news of the Battle of Marengo in northern Italy, which will decide the fate of their symbolically powerful city.

MUSIC

The score of Tosca (if not the drama) itself is considered a prime example of the style of verismo, an elusive term usually translated as “realism.” The typical musical features of the verismo tradition are prominent in Tosca: short arias with an uninhibited flood of raw melody, ambient sounds that blur the distinctions between life and art, and the use of parlato—words spoken instead of sung—at moments of tension.

 

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